Consider this case study:

Bill Smith, a self-employed electrician, purchased a brand new van 15 March 2014 for £18,000. Due to a downturn in the local economy his trading profits for the year to 31 March 2014 were just £9,400. Fortunately, he had secured a number of regular contracts for the following year that should net at least £30,000 in the trading year to 31 March 2015, however, he would be required to travel and hence the purchase of the new van.

Towards the end of June 2014 Bill took his books to his accountant to work out his tax position for 2013-14. In July 2014 Bill was called in for a meeting.

His accountant informed him that his adjusted taxable profits for 2013-14 were £10,400. His accountant also informed him that he could claim a reduced Annual Investment Allowance for the purchase of the van of £1,000 that would clear any tax liability for the year.

Bill was feeling good, no tax to pay. Then, the bad news…

As the initial claim for the van had been made in 2013-14 (due to purchase during March 2014) the balance not written off for tax purposes (£18,000 – £1,000) £17,000 would only be available in later tax years for an 18% writing down allowance. So for the tax year 2014-15 Bill could claim (£17,000 x 18%) £3,060 as a reduction of his profits for that year. Based on estimated profits of £30,000 this would produce a tax bill of approximately £3,400.

Then more bad news, Bill was advised that if he’d delayed the purchase of the van for three weeks, until after 5 April 2014, he could have written off the entire purchase price of the new van against his profits for 2014-15 and reduced his tax bill for that year to £400 instead of £3,400. With no claim for the van in the earlier tax year, his tax bill for 2013-14 would have been £200 and £400 for 2014-15. In total a cash flow saving of £2,800 (£3,400-£200-£400).

The moral of the story is – planning is important.

If you are considering any significant change in your business activities talk it over with us BEFORE you under take the change. The old cliché is supremely relevant: there really is no point in closing the stable door after the horse has bolted.

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